The Chocolate Mousse Diet


Lush chocolate mousse with a healthy surprise inside
That bowl of summer corn chowder is long, long gone and it’s about time, too.

My personal chef work is keeping me busy, and putting me in touch with all sorts of people, each with their own set of dietary needs, likes and dislikes. But what I’m hearing most often when planning meals for clients is their desire to eat a healthy diet. It can be hard to distinguish what “healthy” really means when you see the word pasted on all sorts of processed food in the grocery store, from boxes of cereal to packaged frozen entrees.

What do most people perceive to be a healthy way of eating? My sense is that we all know that the more real, unprocessed food we eat the better, but it’s still a full time job to keep track of all the information out there about what’s good for us or not.

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No-Cook Summer Recipe: Tabbouleh with Fresh Basil

What to make when it’s too hot to cook
Do you ever feel like you’re in a food rut?

I think we all get into a habit of cooking and eating certain things over and over again, either because your seven year old whines for it on a daily basis or simply because you can whip it up with your eyes closed and one hand tied behind your back.

Although my pantry shelves are sagging under the weight of a large array of boxes, bags and jars – all the interesting ingredients I can’t seem to stop myself from collecting for experimentation purposes, I’ve been watching myself reach for the same things to serve as the basis of a quick, one-dish meal when dinner time is nigh and I don’t have a plan; usually some kind of pasta or couscous.

Somewhere along the line I’ve strayed away from good old bulgur. Remember tabbouleh? All you need is hot water and it magically swells into a nourishing meal.

Way back before we made couscous the new “instant” side dish, there was tabbouleh to save the day. Many a college dorm room or apartment kitchen of mine was scented by that little spice packet that came in the tabbouleh box, with its telltale aroma of dried mint and slightly stale cumin.

I had a few friends over for a summer dinner party the other night, and wanted to have most everything made ahead. I had a Middle Eastern flavor theme going, so pulled out one of my favorite cookbooks, Spice by Ana Sortun, and there was a recipe for tabbouleh that jumped out at me.

It turned out to be the perfect thing to round out a summer meal – fast, fresh and I didn’t have to cook it! Well, not unless you count boiling water as cooking.

What I loved about this version was that it uses basil and walnuts, which was a nice twist on the usual parsley-mint-tomato combo.

Summer Tabbouleh with Fresh Basil

Adapted from Spice by Ana Sortun

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 small red onion or shallot, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste
1/2 cup fine or medium bulgur
1 packed cup fresh basil leaves
2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves
1 cup toasted walnuts or almonds
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

In a medium bowl, combine lemon juice, onion, garlic and salt. Let sit about 5 minutes to soften the onion.

Stir in the bulgur along with 1/4 cup hot water. Cover and let stand about 15 minutes, or until the bulgur swells and is tender. Add a bit more water, if needed, if the bulgur is still chewy, and cover until absorbed.

Pulse the basil, parsley, nuts and oil in a food processor until a paste forms. Season with salt and pepper. Add the paste to the bulgur and stir to blend.

Serve topped with grated sharp cheese (such as feta) and toasted pita bread.

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Copyright (c) 2008 FamilyStyle Food

Edamame Dip with Asian Flavors

A simple spread


I have a tendency to wait until the last minute to get things done. I usually chalk it up to my spontaneous nature, but I know it’s really a symptom of literally having too many things on my plate.

Last night we had some friends over for dinner, and as usual, I left the idea of an appetizer up in the air. Coming up with the perfect little nibble before the main meal is served can be tricky – you don’t want to put out too much food since it’s better to keep your guests a tiny bit hungry, but at the same time, there should be something available to help absorb the alcohol from the welcoming cocktail or first glass of wine. Plus there’s always some other thing that needs to be done, like making salad dressing or setting the table.

I usually solve the problem by putting out little dishes of olives or roasted, spiced nuts. They’re both satisfyingly salty, not too filling and will please the vegetarians and omnivores alike. But after going through my freezer yesterday and finding some half-full bags of peas and edamame, I thought I’d use them up to serve with crackers when our friends arrived.

This turned out to be a great idea – I created a quick, last minute homemade appetizer recipe instead of serving the usual tub of hummus dip, with most of the ingredients already on hand in the freezer and pantry. It could be that we were all hungry, but this disappeared in no time.

Edamame Spread with Asian Flavors

8 ounces frozen, shelled edamame
8 ounces frozen peas
1/4 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons tamari or soy sauce
1 crushed garlic clove
1 teaspoon wasabi powder dissolved in water
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Fresh lemon juice, to taste
Fine sea salt, to taste

Drop the edamame and peas in a medium saucepan of generously salted boiling water.

Cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Scoop out about 1/4 cup of the cooking water before draining.

Puree the edamame and peas together in a food processor along with the remaining ingredients, adding water 1 tablespoon at a time as needed to make a smooth, creamy consistency.

Sprinkle a little more cayenne over the spread before serving with rice crackers or flatbread.

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